Tennis – Cross keys tennis http://www.crosskeystennis.com/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 20:15:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-icon-32x32.png Tennis – Cross keys tennis http://www.crosskeystennis.com/ 32 32 New Avicii documentary with never-before-seen archive footage to arrive in 2023 – EDM.com https://www.crosskeystennis.com/new-avicii-documentary-with-never-before-seen-archive-footage-to-arrive-in-2023-edm-com/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 19:09:22 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/new-avicii-documentary-with-never-before-seen-archive-footage-to-arrive-in-2023-edm-com/ With an upcoming documentary, fans of the late Avicii will witness what may be the last vestiges of his rich career. According to a press release shared with EDM.com, a new documentary chronicling Avicii’s journey from unsung beatmaker to legendary dance music artist, is slated for release in 2023. Directed by Henrik Burman and produced […]]]>

With an upcoming documentary, fans of the late Avicii will witness what may be the last vestiges of his rich career.

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From the Archives – Sep 23, 2021 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/from-the-archives-sep-23-2021/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 08:02:01 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/from-the-archives-sep-23-2021/ Many of us have hidden hidden treasures. This postcard was found and returned to the museum last week. This place will bring back many memories to hundreds of residents of Boundary County. With a photograph taken by Will Hawkins and posted by Ross Hall Scenics in Sandpoint, the back of the postcard reads: “This beautiful […]]]>


Many of us have hidden hidden treasures. This postcard was found and returned to the museum last week. This place will bring back many memories to hundreds of residents of Boundary County.

With a photograph taken by Will Hawkins and posted by Ross Hall Scenics in Sandpoint, the back of the postcard reads:

“This beautiful swimming pool faces a luxury motel (with perfect TV reception), a large dining and living room; as well as 70 KOA campsites, a large game room and a gift shop. We are located in the heart of Northwestern hunting and fishing, surrounded by a myriad of lakes, streams and backcountry. Located 1 1/2 miles south of Bonners Ferry, 35 miles from the international line and gateway to the Canadian Rockies.

Miller and Mostek built five new tourist cabins in 1950 along Highway 95 (site of Super 1 and Subway). They called it the M&M Motel. In 1970 Miller and Mostek added KOA campsites. That same year, they renamed it Lantern Motel and added a dining room called Lantern Café, built in an A-frame style.

A fun grand opening was well attended by the community. The place got very “lively” when the Lantern Café acquired its beer license in 1977.

The Boyengers bought the cafe and motel in 1982.

In 2011, a groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Super 1 grocery store. All that remains are exciting memories and stories of the once “infamous” “Lantern Motel, Cafe & Kampground” known in Bonners Ferry, Idaho.

Your Boundary County Historical Society and Museum, 7229 Main, Bonners Ferry, Idaho is sponsoring this column.

Visit the museum Thursday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., visit the website at www.boundarycountymuseum.org or the museum’s Facebook page for historical photos and stories and to see upcoming events. We can be reached at doyouremember@meadowcrk.com or at 208-267-7720. Thanks for your continued support!

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Honors and Academic Achievements | Archives https://www.crosskeystennis.com/honors-and-academic-achievements-archives/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 18:04:00 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/honors-and-academic-achievements-archives/ Locals named to President’s List at Georgia State University To be eligible for the President’s List during the summer semester, students seeking a degree with a minimum Georgia State University GPA of 2.00 must achieve a GPA of 4.0 for semester and complete at least 6 semester hours of academic credit with no incomplete. Students […]]]>

Locals named to President’s List at Georgia State University

To be eligible for the President’s List during the summer semester, students seeking a degree with a minimum Georgia State University GPA of 2.00 must achieve a GPA of 4.0 for semester and complete at least 6 semester hours of academic credit with no incomplete.

Students named to the Douglas County President’s List include:

• Tiffany Padilla-Cilio from Lithia Springs

• Chrysae Robinson of Lithia Springs

• Laila Atkins from Douglasville

• Taliyah Baptiste from Douglasville

• Camryn Bierria from Douglasville

• Natalie Pimentel from Douglasville

• Makayla Smith from Douglasville

• Sandws Ahmady de Lithia Springs

• Brethanie Bananao from Douglasville

• Sarai Brooks from Douglasville

• Gaëlle Burton from Douglasville

• Jonathan Dumas from Douglasville

• Victor Gulley of Winston

• Tyler Harris from Douglasville

• Savanna Keller from Douglasville

• Ethan Lopez from Lithia Springs

• Séverine Louis from Douglasville

• Cassandra Ramos from Douglasville

• Eboni Richardson from Douglasville

• Jennelle Rowser from Douglasville

• Evan Shadix from Douglasville

• Damiana Villanueva from Lithia Springs

• Battle of Jacob de Douglasville

• Samantha Henderson from Douglasville

• Jailyn Johnson of Lithia Springs

• Kelia Pardo from Douglasville

• Deanna Rodriguez from Douglasville

• Jeremy Ernst from Douglasville

• Peter Oyekunle from Douglasville

• Madiena Asisullah from Lithia Springs

• Jailen Corbin from Douglasville

• Fhan-Toe Hodge from Douglasville

• Kerry-Ann James of Lithia Springs

• Janasia Lewis from Douglasville

• Ariana Castro from Douglasville

• Savy Altamirano from Lithia Springs

• Oksana Harrington from Douglasville

• Olivia Jarrett from Douglasville

• Nhu Nguyen from Douglasville

• Marguerite Pinto from Douglasville

• Morgan Sackman of Douglasville

• Mai Han Tran from Douglasville

• Christopher Hayes from Douglasville

• Joseph Vaughns of Douglasville

Locals named on Georgia State University Dean’s List

To be eligible for the Dean’s List during the summer semester, students seeking a degree with a minimum Georgia State GPA of 2.00 must achieve a GPA of 3.50 for the semester. and complete at least 6 semester hours of academic credit without incomplete.

Students on the Douglas County Dean’s List include:

• Korie Amritt from Douglasville

• Robert Swindle of Lithia Springs

• Ryan White from Douglasville

• Tiffany Beasley of Douglasville

• Princess Bonsu of Douglasville

• Hannah Brooks from Douglasville

• Allendria Brown from Douglasville

• Tanielia Campbell from Douglasville

• Danielle room in Douglasville

• Muhammad Khan of Douglasville

• Alejandra Landaverde from Douglasville

• Wajeeha Mehr from Douglasville

• Taylor Morgan of Lithia Springs

• Daniel Navarro from Douglasville

• Julie Nguyen from Douglasville

• Taylor Nixon of Lithia Springs

• Sima Saeed from Douglasville

• David Shepard from Douglasville

• Tahlar Bones from Douglasville

• Leah Davis from Douglasville

• Leslie Magallanes from Douglasville

• Bethany McCullough of Douglasville

• Markel McKenzie from Douglasville

• Leah Terry from Douglasville

• Jessica Washington from Lithia Springs

• Sarah Célestin from Douglasville

• Alyssa Porter from Douglasville

• Morgan Brown from Douglasville

• Jere’Al Dorsey – Emodiae of Lithia Springs

• Chinedu Nwosu from Douglasville

• Eunice Villanueva from Lithia Springs

• Tiffany Bell from Douglasville

• Peris Kagua from Douglasville

• Troy Telfer of Lithia Springs

• Susan Trejo-Garcia from Lithia Springs

• Katelyn Burton from Douglasville

• James JN-Noël from Douglasville

• Andrew Thompson of Lithia Springs

• Brittany Brayton from Douglasville

• Jake W. Coldiron from Douglasville

Locals graduate from Georgia College

Dr Steve Dorman, president of Georgia College, awarded degrees to the class of August 2021.

• Caroline Baccus from Lithia Springs

• Richard Freeman from Douglasville

• Angela Klein from Douglasville

• Sharon Moran of Winston

• Savannah Todd from Douglasville

Georgia College, the state-designated public liberal arts university, combines the educational experience expected at reputable private liberal arts colleges with the affordability of public higher education.

The inhabitants are graduates of the State of Valdosta

Valdosta State University is proud to announce the members of its summer 2021 class. This includes the following region residents:

• Mustapha Cabbell from Douglasville obtained the Doctorate in Education in Curriculum and Teaching

• Joshua Carmichael of Douglasville obtained the title of Education Specialist in Physical Education Coaching Education

• Jared Lawhorn of Lithia Springs graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Anthropology

• Jennifer Ramsey from Douglasville obtained a Bachelor of Business Administration in Management

Over 550 students completed their studies during the 2021 summer semester.

Record 149 cadets attend advanced camp at UNG

A University of North Georgia (UNG) record 149 rising senior cadets completed the Army Forward Camp at Fort Knox, Ky, this summer. A year earlier, the camp was canceled due to COVID-19 and converted to Operation Agile Leader for one year.

The students of the UNG Cadet Corps were grateful to be part of the 38-day forward camp where the U.S. Army Cadet Command tested their military and leadership skills. This allowed the cadet command to assess their skills as future officers. The camp is compulsory for all cadets who request a commission as a military officer.

• Kayla Danley of Winston has completed the forward camp.

• Delphina Djumeni from Douglasville has completed the forward camp.

• Jorge Isidoro-Galeno of Douglasville has completed the forward camp.

A record 33 UNG cadets have earned the Recondo Badge, which is awarded to cadets who demonstrate superior skill by exceeding standards in all camp activities.

Cadet Captain Hayley Farmer, a resident of Griffin, Ga, pursuing a degree in criminal justice, received the USAA Warrior Ethos Award, which is given to a cadet in each of the 11 regiments in the camp.

After the advanced camp, she helped young cadets supervise the base camp, also at Fort Knox. She said her time in the Cadet Corps made summer activities “second nature.”

“Camp reassured me that attending UNG was the best decision I’ve made in my career so far,” Farmer said.

With the Leadership Development Program (LDP) that UNG cadets experienced throughout their junior year, they were ready for whatever the military presented them at Fort Knox.

“Our cadres are the best in the country,” Cadet Col. Ryan Jones said of the UNG military instructors. “They know how to work with cadets and give us the reality of what the Army is.

Jones, a senior from Richmond, Va., Pursuing a degree in strategic and security studies, is the 2021-2022 brigade commander who leads the corps’ more than 700 members.

Cadet Lt. Col. Callie Regal, an elder from Dalton, Ga, pursuing a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies, will command the Second Battalion of the UNG Cadet Corps over the next academic year. She enjoyed the teamwork at Advanced Camp.

“Everyone has their own piece to offer,” said Regal. “You can learn so much from the people around you. You can always ask questions.”

Major Joshua Larson, an assistant professor of military science at the UNG, said the pressure from Advanced Camp has helped army officers like him assess the leadership potential of future officers.

“The performance was seen, but the potential was where the executive came in with their own knowledge and experience,” said Larson. “Tactics were a way to increase or decrease the intensity of cadets in leadership positions to get good observations.

The cohesive approach by which the corps provides opportunities for cadets to lead their own training and events has proven to be beneficial once they reach the high stakes environment.

Cadet Captain Terrance Dorsey, a resident of Jonesboro, Ga. Pursuing a degree in sociology, was excited to develop his skills and help others do the same.

“The time in the field has helped me understand my leadership style,” said Dorsey. “I saw how I function when I am stressed and how other people function when they are stressed.”

Springer receives scholarship at Valdosta State University

Valdosta State University awarded Jamie Springer of Douglasville, Georgia, the Melvene Hardee Endowment Scholarship for the 2021-2022 academic year.

Springer is one of nearly 300 currently enrolled, freshman, or transfer students selected to receive a scholarship through VSU Foundation Inc. These scholarships were created by private donors and are awarded annually to students. having excellent academic results and / or having financial need. . Each recipient represents the high standards of the university.

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New Santa Ana | Tag Archives: Robert Daniel Lucas https://www.crosskeystennis.com/new-santa-ana-tag-archives-robert-daniel-lucas/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:01:42 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/new-santa-ana-tag-archives-robert-daniel-lucas/ SANTA ANA, Calif .– An Army veteran has been charged with kidnapping three Orange County women from running tracks in an Aliso Viejo park and suffocating them, unconscious, raping one of the women and attempted to sexually assault the other two. The man is also suspected of other crimes in Riverside and San Diego counties. […]]]>

SANTA ANA, Calif .– An Army veteran has been charged with kidnapping three Orange County women from running tracks in an Aliso Viejo park and suffocating them, unconscious, raping one of the women and attempted to sexually assault the other two. The man is also suspected of other crimes in Riverside and San Diego counties.

The spate of sexual assaults on women along the walking and running trails in Aliso Viejo began in January 2020 and continued until at least August 2021. The Orange County Sheriff’s Department has released two composite drawings of the attack suspect in the hope of identifying the sexual predator. terrorizing women along the trails.

September 4, 2021, Robert daniel yucas, 51, of Cathedral City in Riverside County has been identified as a suspect in a crime committed in San Diego. DNA collected as a result of this incident matches DNA from two of Aliso Viejo’s attacks.

Yucas, who is a pilot of the Kalitta Air cargo plane, was arrested Thursday in Anchorage, Alaska, after a return flight from China. He is awaiting his extradition to California.

Yucas was charged with three counts of kidnapping for committing a sexual offense, one count of forcible rape, one count of attempted rape and three counts of assault with intent to commit a sexual offense.

He faces a maximum sentence of 39 years in life plus 6 years in state prison if convicted on all counts.

On January 20, 2020, a 24-year-old woman was at Woodfield Park in Aliso Viejo to skateboard when a man later identified as Yucas asked her for directions. As the woman pulled out her phone, Yucas is accused of grabbing the woman in a choke and dragging her through the bushes next to the walking path. The woman passed out and woke up to find that she had been raped.

On April 2, 2020, a 32-year-old woman was running in Woodfield Park when a man later identified as Yucas grabbed her from behind and put her in a choke. Yucas is accused of dragging the woman into the bushes in an attempt to rape her, but the woman managed to push him away.

On August 28, 2021, a 41-year-old woman was in Woodfield Park when a man grabbed her and put her in a choke. The woman passed out and woke up in the bushes next to a walking path with her pants down.

Anonymous advice to OC Crime Stoppers led investigators to the September 4, 2021 incident in San Diego that ultimately led to the detection of DNA that matched the suspect of that attack with the suspect of the Orange County attacks. Collaboration between law enforcement, including the Orange County Sheriff’s Department, and the San Diego, Anchorage and Cathedral City Police Departments, made the arrest possible.

Authorities are asking anyone with additional information regarding Yucas or any other victim to call the Orange County Sheriff’s Department Sexual Assault Unit at 714-647-7419. Yucas lived in Aliso Viejo before moving to Cathedral City in Riverside County and he is known to spend time in San Diego County.

“The three victims in this case were doing things that many of us do every day. But the suspect kidnapped these victims, strangled them, sexually assaulted them and changed their lives forever, ”said Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes. “Thank you to the Orange County Crime Lab, Orange County Crime Stoppers, San Diego Police Department, and Anchorage International Airport Police and Fire Department for their assistance in identifying and making this arrest. We all want to live in a neighborhood where we feel safe to do something as simple as taking a walk. With this arrest we have regained a little piece of that sense of safety. “

“Sexual predators don’t stop until we stop them,” Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer said. “An entire community lived in fear of being the next victims to be taken off a trail, suffocated, unconscious and raped. The bravery of an anonymous informant in providing information about this predator led to his capture and likely prevented other women from being sexually assaulted. These women endured unimaginable horror at the hands of a stranger who hunted them like prey. Now that this sexual predator is behind bars, my job is to make sure he is held accountable for these heinous crimes to the fullest extent of the law. The way we keep him from hurting other women is by keeping him behind bars for the rest of his life.

Assistant District Attorney Raquel Cooper of the Sexual Assault Unit is continuing this case.

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Homeless Archives – PubliCola https://www.crosskeystennis.com/homeless-archives-publicola/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 22:46:27 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/homeless-archives-publicola/ Screenshot: King County YouTube By Erica C. Barnett An alarming increase in COVID cases among people who are homeless has been exacerbated in recent weeks, according to homeless service providers, by rumors that if people enter an isolation and quarantine site operated by county, they will not be allowed to leave. And even before these […]]]>
Screenshot: King County YouTube

By Erica C. Barnett

An alarming increase in COVID cases among people who are homeless has been exacerbated in recent weeks, according to homeless service providers, by rumors that if people enter an isolation and quarantine site operated by county, they will not be allowed to leave.

And even before these rumors began to circulate widely, many homeless people who tested positive for COVID were reluctant to go into isolation and quarantine, for reasons ranging from substance use to fear that if they left a camp. , they would lose everything they had – a not unreasonable assumption, given the recent increase in encampment sweeps.

“The resistance, in my experience, has been widespread,” said Dr Cyn Kotarski, medical director of the Public Defender Association. “I haven’t met anyone so far who isn’t afraid and resistant to doing it, and that’s mostly because it’s overwhelming. It can be quite scary to think that you don’t know where you are going or why, especially when you take someone out of their own surroundings and their own community, ”Kotarski said. The PDA is a partner in several efforts to move homeless people to hotels during the pandemic, including Co-LEAD and JustCare.

Although early reports suggest that people living outdoors are less susceptible to COVID infection than those living in collective neighborhoods like collective shelters, the more contagious delta variant could reverse this trend. In the week ended September 10, King County counted 41 homeless people who tested positive for COVID – an undercount, as this only represents the county’s test events.

According to King County Public Health spokesperson Kate Cole, last week there were 22 active COVID cases associated with camp outbreaks, defined as two or more people who tested positive in a camp – an “increase from baseline” of “one to four cases per month associated with encampments. A examining the county’s weekly reports shows a steady increase in cases that started in early August and have not declined.

“The facilities are not secure, and the stay is completely optional. When people come in, we say, “Your isolation period is so long, your quarantine period is so long. If you don’t want to stay all the time, let’s talk about it. ‘ —Hedda McClendon, King County

The increase in COVID cases has impacted all parts of the county’s service system. The county public health department offers testing and transportation for people who test positive, but service providers and county officials say the system is stretched, with long waits for transportation and even testing. . According to Hedda McClendon, director of the King County COVID Emergency Services Group, the current wait for a test by the county’s HEART E team, one of two teams that conducts testing at homeless settlements, is between five and seven days. When a person living in an encampment tests positive, a nearby service provider often has to wait with them for hours until a county vehicle arrives to pick up. in isolation and quarantine, increasing the likelihood that they will give up and decide not to go.

Just having someone on the phone, social workers say, can be a challenge. “You call and they take your number, but if you call back it’s an automated line and you have to try to reach the person you were talking to” Dawn Shepard, the Southern District Outreach Coordinator for REACH, said. If an outreach worker or homeless person misses a call from the county’s COVID hotline, Shepard says, they’ll have to start the whole process over again, “and at that point the person loses interest.” Currently, Shepard added, “It takes us about eight hours from coordination to pickup. “

The county, through a partnership with T-Mobile, has distributed around 500 cellphones to proximity service providers to distribute to customers, according to Cole, but Stewart says they need more, as well as rapid COVID testing for that people don’t have to. wait days to be tested. Currently, rapid tests are difficult to find and expensive when available.

During this time, the number of people staying at the Kent isolation and quarantine site, where 60 rooms are currently available, rose from zero to 50 virtually “overnight,” McClendon said, stretching resources. If all the rooms fill up, the county will need to start sorting people based on test results, exposure and other qualifications, turning people down if their cases aren’t serious.

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Shepard said that at the start of the pandemic, “we really didn’t see people who lived outside contracting the disease… largely because the viral load is much lower when you’re outside. . Now, however, I think it’s safe to say that with the Delta variant our customers don’t have the same protection as we see it all over town.

Shelter providers, including Compass and WHEEL, also confirm they have seen an increase in cases; According to WHEEL organizer Michele Marchand, COVID is “tearing apart scores of homeless programs and communities,” including the WHEEL women’s shelter at First Presbyterian Church on First Hill, which has seen at least 11 positive cases over the course of the last few weeks. “We have had to stop making admissions now because of this epidemic,” Marchand continued, adding that the organization was seeking funds for hotel vouchers “to meet immediate needs during the current crisis.”

Charlene Mitchell, program director at Jan Women’s Shelter and Peter’s Place run by Compass Housing, said the shelter requires people who test positive to stay “in their bed zone” while they wait to be taken to the site. in Kent, a process that’s considerably faster than testing and moving homeless people. (Currently the county uses yellow taxis for this purpose). She recalls a recent case where a woman left the shelter for the Kent site and decided not to stay. “She turned around [after arriving] and stayed out on the streets and at the bus stop “after family members refused to take him in. “She recovered, but I don’t know who infected everything,” while she was contagious, Mitchell said.

Shepard says she has encountered a growing number of homeless people who tell her they have COVID-like symptoms but don’t want to be tested or go into isolation and quarantine because they’re afraid they won’t be allowed from. “There was this big push, when the segregation and quarantine were opened, that they weren’t going to hold people against their will, but now there are stories going around about what is happening to them. people.” Shepard says she takes these stories “with a grain of salt – when I asked who had this experience, it’s just like, ‘everyone knows'” – but says they made an impact nonetheless. . “The great thing I’m hearing right now is, ‘No, I don’t want to go because they won’t let me go. »» Continue reading “As COVID cases in camps and shelters increase, many are reluctant to enter county quarantine sites”

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Freeman’s rival Perec flees Sydney Olympics https://www.crosskeystennis.com/freemans-rival-perec-flees-sydney-olympics/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 00:30:00 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/freemans-rival-perec-flees-sydney-olympics/ The Age’s coverage of Perec’s departure from the Sydney OlympicsCredit:Age The situation did not improve after Perec, now in hysterical sobs, turned off her cell phone to board a flight to Melbourne, where she spoke to Menant again shortly after midnight. She seemed calmer this time and told Menant that she was eager to seek […]]]>

The Age’s coverage of Perec’s departure from the Sydney OlympicsCredit:Age

The situation did not improve after Perec, now in hysterical sobs, turned off her cell phone to board a flight to Melbourne, where she spoke to Menant again shortly after midnight.

She seemed calmer this time and told Menant that she was eager to seek comfort from her family. Leading begged Perec to stay, begged her not to give up, and Perec hesitated but eventually boarded his flight from Singapore.

But her family, in the form of boyfriend Maybanks, only served to tarnish her increasingly hysterical image upon arriving in Singapore early yesterday. Maybanks, airports and television crews proved to be a deadly combination in his partner’s unsuccessful attempt for a third 400-meter Olympic title.

Upon arriving in Sydney, Maybanks attempted to block a Channel 7 cameraman with his luggage cart. The Singapore incident created more concern.

“Give me the tape,” asked Maybanks, a non-US Olympic relay runner, “You don’t come near me or I’ll hurt you. “

Singapore police said late yesterday they would not press charges against Maybanks after the couple left Singapore for Europe.

Given that Perec was considered by Australia to be the woman between Freeman and Australia’s first Olympic track gold medal since Seoul 1988, you might think that the tortuous and bizarre retirement of the Frenchwoman from the Games the Sydney Olympics was a source of celebration yesterday at Camp Freeman.

Not so. Freeman’s relatives weren’t saying much except that the frontrunner was taken aback by Perec’s departure. It was also pointed out that as long as Perec remains a confirmed starter in tonight’s heat, she will be seen as a threat.

The strong French theory in several reports, however, was that it was Freeman who unknowingly excited Perec with his starring role in the Olympic Opening Ceremony. Perec and Freeman have only seen each other on TV for the past few weeks, but when Perec, who has not paraded with the France squad, watched Freeman light the cauldron, she reportedly broke down emotionally.

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The story of Marie-José Perec, who grew up in Guadeloupe in the Caribbean and became Reebok’s highest-paid female athlete after her two gold medals in Atlanta and also a popular star on the French catwalks, seems to be s’ to be ended in farce and sadness but there was little sympathy for Perec from the French contingent in Sydney yesterday.

Adam Taloni, the manager of Perec’s Sydney home, the Grand Mercure Apartments, denied that she had been threatened or that an intruder had knocked on her door and harassed her. French chef de mission Michel Vial, who tried unsuccessfully for two days to contact Perec before his departure, said Perec had made a “bad decision” not to stay in the village.

When asked if Perec had arrived in Sydney and had been training periodically at Narrabeen on Sydney’s North Peninsula just to satisfy sponsors, Vial replied: “It would be a shame if that was (the reason). It would be loathsome.

Perec had only competed in one 400-meter race since his loss to Freeman at the end of the 1996 season and trained in secret all year round in Rostock on the Baltic Sea under the direction of the last of a trainer series, Wolfgang Meier. For years, Perec had claimed that Meier’s wife, 400-meter world record holder Marita Koch, was a drug cheater. Then at the start of the year, she hired him as a coach.

In July, she accepted a rare interview with France TV6 but when the team arrived in Rostock, she said in front of the camera: “I don’t care about TV. I don’t care about the media and you can’t imagine how much I care about you. I do not need you.

She fled with as much determination from the French media as from the Australian she accused of harassing her. Noted Le Figaro Cédric Voisard yesterday: “She herself built the problems in Australia. The safest place you can live during the Games is the village. She’s paranoid. The real question is: did she really want to run? This is the big question for Reebok, its sponsor.

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The biggest Australian winner in regards to Perec’s first round tonight, however, was Nova Peris-Kneebone. His heat remains harsh, even without Perec. Now two of Freeman’s biggest threats to the 400m final are Briton Katharine Merry and Jamaican Sandie Richards, and both will face Peris-Kneebone.

And Freeman’s response to the Perec saga? “Cathy was gracious and courageous in addressing the issue at the Australian press conference on Tuesday,” said Simon Allatson, Managing Director of Athletic Australia. “Cathy Freeman is a class act and I think she has blossomed tremendously since she was cleared and decided to take care of these things more on her own.”

While Perec’s midnight departure caused some happiness in parts of the Australian camp, Freeman was not celebrating.

Just as Perec watched from afar Freeman light the Olympic cauldron last Friday night, Freeman looked at Perec. And since all the times she watched Perec’s little screens fleeing, Freeman never saw her disappear.

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Savannah’s 1845 building codes written to prevent fires https://www.crosskeystennis.com/savannahs-1845-building-codes-written-to-prevent-fires/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 11:00:21 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/savannahs-1845-building-codes-written-to-prevent-fires/ When you look around the historic district of Savannah, you might notice that almost all of the buildings are made of brick. It was more than just aesthetic preference, it was an intentional choice meant to protect the citizens of Savannah. In our latest installment of the Obscure Ordinance series, we share an ordinance from […]]]>

When you look around the historic district of Savannah, you might notice that almost all of the buildings are made of brick. It was more than just aesthetic preference, it was an intentional choice meant to protect the citizens of Savannah. In our latest installment of the Obscure Ordinance series, we share an ordinance from 1845 that outlines an early form of building code prohibiting the construction of buildings in or around the city unless they are made from non-combustible materials such as than brick or stone.

A Digest of All the Ordinances of the City of Savannah which were in effect July 1, 1854 ... by Charles S. Henry, Esq., And published by Order of the Council (Savannah: Purse's Print, 1854), page 200.

Throughout its history, Savannah has endured numerous devastating fires that have destroyed much of the city and claimed the lives of citizens. In 1796, a fire broke out behind a bakery in the city’s market district and quickly spread throughout the densely populated district, destroying more than 220 buildings. In 1820, a disastrous fire raged through the neighborhoods around Ellis Square, destroying almost everything between Broughton and Bay streets. The area ravaged by the fire can be seen in color on this excerpt from an 1820 map made by surveyor John McKinnon.

In order to prevent further devastation from such fires, the city council passed ordinances that regulated building materials to what was considered incombustible, as well as laws on the manner and quantities of lumber and gunpowder. that can be stored in a placer.

A Digest of All the Ordinances of the City of Savannah which were in effect July 1, 1854 ... by Charles S. Henry, Esq., And published by Order of the Council (Savannah: Purse's Print, 1854), page 208.

Sadly, these regulations were not enough to prevent the great fire of 1889 which started in Hogan’s Dry Goods at the corner of Broughton and Barnard streets and destroyed more than 50 buildings for an estimated loss of $ 1.25 million. For more on 19th-century fire protection in the city of Savannah, see the 1854 City Code Book, which can be viewed here.

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Church Street Market Planning and Development in Burlington https://www.crosskeystennis.com/church-street-market-planning-and-development-in-burlington/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 01:38:00 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/church-street-market-planning-and-development-in-burlington/ BURLINGTON, Vt. (WCAX) – This weekend, Burlington celebrates the 40th anniversary of the opening of Church Street Marketplace. We have searched the archives of WCAX to share its history with you. Burlington architect Bill Truex is credited with the idea of ​​the market, having been inspired by a pedestrian mall he saw on a trip […]]]>

BURLINGTON, Vt. (WCAX) – This weekend, Burlington celebrates the 40th anniversary of the opening of Church Street Marketplace. We have searched the archives of WCAX to share its history with you.

Burlington architect Bill Truex is credited with the idea of ​​the market, having been inspired by a pedestrian mall he saw on a trip to Denmark in the 1960s. In 1979, Truex presented four plans for revitalization of Church Street to city officials.

As Channel 3’s Nick Bogart reported, closing the Church Street to cars was not an easy sale.

(April 6, 1979) “And the last choice would be to close Church Street between Bank and Cherry for a pedestrian square”, reports Bogart.

Market committee chairman Patrick Robbins says keeping traffic on the streets is being favored by traders, the mayor and the so-called panel of experts who came to examine Burlington last month. But city traffic planner Donald Morley had some trouble with the idea.

“I’m not sure the motor vehicle is a good design element in our city,” Morley said.

Eventually, the idea of ​​pedestrians prevailed and Mayor Gordon Paquette celebrated when voters approved a bond to pay for the construction of the market.

(October 31, 1979) “I think we had a lot of very good arguments for the market and I think that’s why it won today,” said Mayor Paquette.

As Channel 3’s Bill Felling reported, fears of business losses to suburban malls, like University Mall, helped convince voters.

“While this is not the end of the city’s problems or the answer to the mall, it gives merchants a sense of security that the city center can compete with any suburban mall,” Felling reports.

Construction began in the spring of 1980 with the two downtown blocks officially closed to traffic in July of the same year. Over the next 16 months, the town’s shopping center was dug up and bricked up. And on September 15, 1981, the market opened with a big party. The upper block of the street was closed to traffic in 1994. And the block between Main and College became pedestrian-only in 2005.

Today, with crowds of pedestrians, vendors, and restaurants filling the market, it’s hard to imagine Church Street in the past.

Copyright 2021 WCAX. All rights reserved.

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News Journal archives for the week of September 19 include arrest of Patty Hearst and death of President Garfield https://www.crosskeystennis.com/news-journal-archives-for-the-week-of-september-19-include-arrest-of-patty-hearst-and-death-of-president-garfield/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 09:05:28 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/news-journal-archives-for-the-week-of-september-19-include-arrest-of-patty-hearst-and-death-of-president-garfield/ “Pages of history” features excerpts from the News Journal archives, including the Wilmington Morning News, the Morning News, the Every Evening and the Evening Journal. September 19, 1975, The Morning News SLA threesome Patty Hearst caught in San Francisco Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst and her three fugitive companions were captured without a fight in San […]]]>

“Pages of history” features excerpts from the News Journal archives, including the Wilmington Morning News, the Morning News, the Every Evening and the Evening Journal.

September 19, 1975, The Morning News

SLA threesome Patty Hearst caught in San Francisco

Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst and her three fugitive companions were captured without a fight in San Francisco yesterday, ending one of the longest and strangest manhunts in American history….

The sudden and unspectacular apprehension – by FBI agents and San Francisco police – provided a “moan” ending the violent history of the Symbionese Liberation Army.

Miss Hearst, the 21-year-old daughter of Randolph A. Hearst, president of the San Francisco Examiner, was held on $ 500,000 total bail on criminal charges in San Francisco and Los Angeles. His lawyer, Terence Hallinan, said his family would seek to provide the money….

Among those arrested, William Harris and his wife, Emily, are avowed members of SLA, the small terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the assassination of Marcus Foster, the principal of the black school in Oakland, Calif., and who then kidnapped Miss Hearst from her apartment in Berkeley on February 4, 1974….

Wendy Yoshimura, 32, was also arrested, who has never been identified as a member of the SLA, but who has been wanted since 1972 for storing a huge cache of explosives found in a Berkeley garage….

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Palmer denounces National Archives decision to label founding documents “potentially dangerous language” https://www.crosskeystennis.com/palmer-denounces-national-archives-decision-to-label-founding-documents-potentially-dangerous-language/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 20:16:09 +0000 https://www.crosskeystennis.com/palmer-denounces-national-archives-decision-to-label-founding-documents-potentially-dangerous-language/ Friday marks the 234th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. On a day set aside for the celebration of the nation’s supreme legal document, many objected to the National Archives Records Administration’s (NARA) decision to put warning labels on the nation’s founding documents. Chief among these critics is US Representative Gary Palmer (R-Hoover), […]]]>

Friday marks the 234th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. On a day set aside for the celebration of the nation’s supreme legal document, many objected to the National Archives Records Administration’s (NARA) decision to put warning labels on the nation’s founding documents.

Chief among these critics is US Representative Gary Palmer (R-Hoover), chairman of the House Republican Policy Committee. In denouncing the NARA decision, Palmer emphasized the importance of the Congressional Oath of Office, in which members of Congress swear to respect sacred documents.

I solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will carry true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reserve or purpose of escape; and that I will perform well and faithfully the duties of the office into which I am about to enter. So help me God.

“This is the oath that I, along with every serving member of Congress, must take at the start of every new Congress,” said Palmer. “Yet the very federal government entity charged with the duty and responsibility to protect and preserve the document that we have sworn to defend and defend believes” warning labels “should be affixed.”

In a statement to Fox News, NARA said the label serves to warn readers of “outdated” language.

“Our archives cover the history of the United States, and it is our responsibility to preserve and make these historical archives available to the public,” NARA told Fox News. “Some of the materials featured in the catalog show or describe violent or graphic events, or use outdated, biased, offensive or violent language.”

The congressman criticized the administration’s decision, saying NARA’s actions run counter to the first US president’s desire to “never abandon” the founding document.

Palmer continued, “The very people charged with preserving the document that George Washington had promised never to abandon have effectively abandoned the document. With the 234th anniversary of our Constitution being signed today, all Americans should celebrate the document that created the greatest form of government the world has ever known.

Palmer lambasted NARA’s placement of “Harmful Content Warning” labels above the nation’s founding text as an action he deems “extremely radical”.

“However, the National Archives classified the Constitution as possibly containing ‘racist, sexist, ableist, misogynist / misogynist and xenophobic opinions and attitudes; discriminate against or exclude various opinions on sexuality, gender, religion, etc. This is just one more illustration of the extreme radicalism of the Biden administration, ”said Palmer.

The House Republican Policy leader says “radical liberal activists” want to dismantle American identity.

“The idea that our Constitution needs a warning label is ludicrous and an affront to the history and values ​​of our country,” he added. “Millions of people risked everything to come to America because of what our Declaration and Constitution promised. But today, radical liberal activists at the National Archives posing as public servants are determined to destroy our national identity, to divide us and to shame our country. I can assure you that a divided house will not hold up.

Palmer then pledged his unwavering commitment to uphold the oath he took to protect the principles on which the nation was founded.

He concluded: “I am grateful for what our Founding Fathers gave us, for the promises enshrined in the Declaration of Independence and the brilliant structure of government in the Constitution that has served us so well. As for me, I will always respect my oath and stand up against those who threaten the foundations of our freedom.

Dylan Smith is a writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @DylanSmithAL

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